Top 3 Items New Parents Waste Money On

Tips for new parents buying baby items advice for saving money

In today’s oversaturated “made-for-baby” market, expectant parents routinely feel compelled to buy a whole suite of special items for their newborn, but almost never end up using.

So if you’re shopping for a baby on the way and want to save a few (hundred) dollars, here are three items you can confidently leave on the shelf.




“Must-have” baby items you can actually live without

1) Baby shoes. Aside from the obvious fact that your newborn baby can’t walk, there is also the reality of what new babies really wear for the first six months: one-piece footed sleepers for the colder months, and simple onesies for the hotter times of year – no shoes (or socks) required. Moreover, newborn babies sleep most of the day, and won’t be wearing shoes inside their swaddled-up blankets. For those trips outside the house, you’ll quickly find that tiny shoes will not stay on a wiggly baby foot in a car seat or the stroller. You’re much better off saving your money for shoes in the toddler years.

2) Crib bedding. Don’t be fooled by the cute, coordinating prints and “all-in-one” appeal of these pricey packages: all most parents really use in baby’s crib is one single fitted sheet. Bumper pads and pillows are considered hazards to newborns and are no longer recommended. And once your baby is 2 or 3 months of age, they’ll be travelling around the crib in their sleep, making loose sheets and blankets a nuisance at best. An item to consider investing in is a sleep sack, or some one-piece cozy sleepers, to help you save money while helping baby get a better night’s sleep.

3) Bottle sanitizer. Here’s an item that falls into the crafty category of appearing like a necessary time-saver for frazzled new parents, but that really just takes up counter space and collects dust. You’re much more likely to sanitize bottles with the appliances and tools already in your kitchen: your dishwasher or a pot of boiling water.

Ditto for a whole range of everyday items you probably already have, but are marketed to parents with the word “baby” on it: baby food makers (your existing blender, food processor or potato masher do the exact same job); “baby detergent” (just like regular “free-from” or unscented detergent you probably already have); and “classical music for babies” (all the regular classical music, but with more babies on the cover art).